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Tips for shooting shoes

edited August 2016 Posted in » Canon T3i Forum
Hello all,

I'm sure you come across these posts daily, but I just wanted to ask a few questions. I own a Canon EOS Rebel T3i. Majority of my life has been spent collecting sneakers (I know weird), and I just started to take pictures of them. I'm stiill getting used to the camera, but what is everyone's opinion on the settings should use? I don't think there is a way for me to upload pictures here so you can give me pointers.



Comments

  • edited August 2016
    Hi,
    Product photography can be challenging, but good results can be gained with a little effort. I have just photographed my wife's collection of Italian leather handbags.
    Here's how I did it.
    a) Cut a long side panel from a decent sized cardboard box and lined the box with white paper.
    b) Placed the box on a table placed near a bright, netted window. It is better if the window is netted as this evens out the light.
    c) Mounted the camera on a tripod. If you haven't got one, you should consider getting one. Even a cheap table-top type has it uses.
    d) Using the kit 18-55mm lens, set your camera to aperture priority (AV mode) and set aperture to f/4. Set your ISO to something like 200 or 400.
    e) Adjust the cardboard box until you are satisfied that your sneaker is quite well lit and your tripod and camera position to make sure you are making the most of the product. Then shoot.
    f) Provided the day doesn't suddenly turn into blackness, you should be able to use this set-up for quite a few products, but remember to adjust the position of the box and camera occasionally to allow for the movement of the sun. Your camera will choose suitable shutter speeds to match the aperture and ISO you have set to give good exposure. Look up exposure compensation in your manual. If your shots seem a little dark then dial in a + amount of comp - if they seem too light dial in a - amount. Don't go mad though.
    Good luck and get back to let us know how you got on. Your experience helps add to the knowledge base in these forums.
    PBked
  • edited August 2016
    @PBKED, thank you for all the information, it was extremely helpful. I also purchased a mini tripod that should be arriving today! What would you suggest if I wanted to take pictures outside with the actual sneaker on foot and using a remote to take them (portraits I guess you would call them)?
  • edited August 2016
    Hi again,
    It is an idea, but personally I wouldn't, especially if you live in a sandy or dusty area. Plus I think an ankle with a sock and maybe trousers would detract from the main focus which is the sneaker. But what the hell - give it a go. Nothing ventured, nothing gained and with digital 1 press of a button is all it takes to get rid of a crap shot.
    Regards,
    PBked
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