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Overexposed using normal mode

edited May 2016 Posted in » Canon 60D Forum
Dear all,

I've used the Canon EOSD350 for some while and I am now using the Canon D60. When using the live view mode, all programs do work fine, but when I use the same settings in normal mode, all the images are overexposed. For example, in an outdoor recording, the live view uses ISO 100, but the normal mode ISO 400 (only switching between modes, recording in automatic mode). This issue appears for all settings, except using the lens non-zoomed. The lens I use is the Tamron 18-270mm f/3.5-6.5. I know there might be a small difference in ISO due to the difference in measurement between AF and live view, and of course one could correct for the overexposure, but this would mean one still needs the live view for a correct measurement. I do not prefer to use live view.
Could this be an issue of the lens or is the measurement wrong?
Anyone any idea?

Regards,
Ruud

Comments

  • edited May 2016
    Hi @RUUD,
    I am not quite sure what you mean when you refer to "normal" mode. If you mean normal as when using the viewfinder, then it would be helpful to know what camera mode you are using (P, A, S, M or Full Auto).
    In the meantime, check your exposure compensation. This is one setting that does not zero itself even if the camera is switched off and back on. If a + amount of exposure has been set, which would cause overexposure problems, you must manually return the setting to 0.
    PBked
  • edited May 2016
    Hi @PBKED,

    In normal mode, I mean the use of the viewfinder. The difference in exposure occurs in all modes, full automatic, portraits, landscape and even all the manual settings; it's a difference between live view and viewfinder.
    I know how to use the exposure compensation, so you are right in your suggestion, but the difference in exposure is bigger at higher zooms (eg ISO 100 or 400 for zoom 200mm). Using 18-50mm zoom, the difference is relatively small, maybe the know difference between type of measurement of AF viewfinder and live view. I am not sure if it is correct to state that the difference in exposure between live view and viewfinder is linear with the zoom.
    To compensate for exposure works fine in manual modes, but not for the automatic programs. And sometimes I do want to keep life a bit easier by using the landscape or full automatic mode.

    Ruud
  • edited May 2016
    Live view using the Quick setting focuses in the same way as using the viewfinder.
    Have you tried taking a static subject in good light with your Tamron using Live View, and then switching to viewfinder and repeating the shots?
    Here is what I would do:
    Set up an object just over 50cm away (your Tamron close focuses to 49cm throughout the range).
    Choose aperture priority at f/4 and Auto ISO.
    Take shots at 18, 55, 70, 100, 150, 200, 250 in Live View using the quick setting.
    Switch to viewfinder and repeat the shots.
    Allowing for slight variations due to the ambient light, the stats for your Live View and viewfinder shots should be almost identical. If they are not, then there is something wrong.
    PBked
  • edited May 2016
    Hi,

    First I checked the issue using a Canon EF 90-300mm 1:4.5-5.6 USM and the same problem appears. I've uploaded the photos into dropbox so have a look yourself.
    I appreciate the time you spend on the problem.

    Regards

    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/47gs7i8xcuinwsh/AAAXTa3Q8wOw_Zg7JTRaIVTza?dl=0
  • edited May 2016
    Now I see your shots, I can understand the problem more but not explain it.
    You can rule out your lenses or the contacts on both the lens and camera because you would get problems in live view as well.
    I assume you have gone into the menus and returned the camera to factory default settings. If you haven't it might be worth a try.
    Other than that, I think a trip to a service agent is required. Sorry I can't be of more help.
    PBked
  • edited May 2016
    Hi PBked (and others),

    Thanks again for helping me with what might be wrong. I guess something is wrong with the AF light detection. Using live view, the detection is directly at the sensor. Using AF, the mirror is in between and the light beam follows another routing. Since the deviation is more than the difference in routing, something must be wrong.
    Today I've contacted the supplier and they will check the overexposure and will then send the camera to Canon.
    I will continue using the EOS 350D which did a great job in the past, and I am sure he will do it for anther few weeks.
    Anyhow, thanks again, and I will let you know what the outcome of the service by Canon is.

    Regards,

    Ruud

  • edited May 2016
    Yes. Please let us know the outcome of Canon's investigation. This will help lead to better information on these forums. The 350D was my first digital DSLR and I kept using it way past its sell by date because it was such an easy camera to use and gave great shots.
    Regards,
    PBked
  • edited May 2016
    Dear all,

    Today I received a message from the supplier. The D60 has been repaired by Canon. The light sensor has been fixed (mounted) and adjusted. That was all the information provided. I will receive the camera tomorrow and I will let you know if I can find out other things changed or adjusted.
    Ruud
  • edited May 2016
    Thanks for that report @RUUD. Will look forward to your findings when you get your camera back.
    PBked
  • edited June 2016
    So the camera is back for a few weeks. As mentioned before, there was only a brief description about the maintenance. What does make sense is that the light sensor has been mounted which means that there is now a correct light when the mirror reflecting to the light sensor. Due to an offset of the light sensor, hardly any light could enter the sensor and therefore pushing the ISO value up to values corresponding to, for example, night photography. Although the live view measurement on the image sensor is slightly different then using the AF, the difference is now reduced to a minimum having the light sensor mounted correctly.

    At this point I want to thank the supplier and Canon for handling the complaints correctly, fast and without pointing fingers to the user.

    Thanks,
    Ruud
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