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Malfunctioning on Manual

edited September 2015 Posted in » Nikon D3100 Forum
I've noticed that all my pictures taken in "Manual" are extremely light, almost a pale white, almost like I have set the ISO to the maximum high. In fact it's at 100. In "Automatic" mode, it works just fine? Any suggestions? Thanks.

Comments

  • edited September 2015
    If your manual settings are high enough to cause overexposure at ISO 100, the camera's meter will not be able to make any corrections.

    As a first step you should enable the "overview" option in the playback menu, so that you can actually see what settings the camera used for a shot, and look at the histogram for the shot.

    Remember that in manual mode, the shutter speed is controlled by the rear wheel, and the aperture by the combination of the rear wheel and the exposure compensation button.

    You cannot count on a setting being transferred to manual mode from a previous mode. Only settings you have made manually in a mode that allows manual settings will be used in manual mode. Any settings the camera makes automatically, including those from P mode or Auto mode, will not automatically transfer.

    As a starting point, and to make sure manual mode is working, I suggest you put the camera on "program" mode, and take a normal picture. Note exactly what settings the image used: shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. Now go to manual mode, and manually enter the same shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. If you get a picture close to the first, then it's working correctly.

    It is possible for a lens aperture to stick, causing overexposure. As a check on this, go to aperture priority, and set your aperture at a high number, such as f/22. It does not matter whether you get a clear shot, or whether the camera jiggles from too slow a shutter. Just set the aperture, let the camera set the shutter speed, and shoot. The nasty, blurry picture you get should be well exposed. If it is white, then suspect the lens.
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