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If you're just starting out in the world of photography and want to learn how to get the most out of your camera, then this forum is your new secret hangout spot!

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Welcome to the Canon SL1 / 100D Forum for Beginners

Howdy dudes and dudettes! Well, it's pretty simple. If you've got questions about your Canon SL1 / 100D, you can start a new discussion and get tons of helpful replies from other SL1 / 100D owners all across the world, including yours truly. :)

To get started, go ahead and register an account here at Camera Tips.

Next, just click the Start a New Discussion button at the top of the page.

To reply to a current topic, navigate to the Canon SL1 / 100D Forum homepage, click a discussion thread and you'll see a Post Comment button towards the bottom of the discussion.

Happy shooting!

Comments

  • edited May 2016
    Hi, I'm new to photography. I have a Canon Rebel SL1 that came with an 18-55mm and a 75-300mm lens (bundle package). I use the 18-55mm for more of just every day photos, but I have my first wedding deal coming up, and I'm really nervous about being the photographer. I've read on other blogs about the most common lens used for weddings is the 70-200mm. Any suggestions or advice on which lens I should or shouldn't use for this wedding?
  • edited May 2016
    Hi there.
    My usual advice to people who ask about doing weddings is "Don't".
    However, if you must, here are some thoughts. I don't know who is commonly using a 70-200mm, but it would not be my choice. A long focal length is fine for candid shots taken without the subject's knowledge, but unless your church is in a huge field where you can afford to back off, a long zoom is not much good for the group shots.
    I could suggest some suitable lenses, some cheapish others not, but I am not going to recommend you rush out and buy them for this first occasion.
    Stick with the lens you know, the 18-55mm. It is wide enough for most wedding groups and long enough for some unobtrusive close-ups. If you want better bokeh (blurry backgrounds), just move your groups and subjects away from backgrounds especially if it consists of foliage.
    I could prattle on with other tips forever as I devoted 5 years of my life as a semi-pro wedding photographer. For a beginner I would suggest Program Mode and Auto white balance and ISO. However, as I don't know your skill set I am not going to advise you further. Instead I'm going to wish you good luck and remember to forget about your equipment and just think about what you see in the viewfinder.
    PBked
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