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Cropped Pictures

edited October 2012 Posted in » Canon 60D Forum
How do you zoom into pictures from Canon's program and save them? I have a 60D and I tried using Canon's programs. I can zoom in, but when I ask the program to save it goes back to the original image. Can someone help?

Comments

  • edited October 2012
    Hi Cliff,
    I think the effect you are after is to enlarge your pictures. You can resize your pictures if you want them enlarged or if you just want to enlarge a portion of them you can use the crop tool. Cropping your picture enlarges the area you choose (I think that is what you meant by zooming in). Once cropped, you can then save your picture to a different file name.
    Hope this helps.
    Regards,
    PBked
  • edited January 2014
    Can you please explain how to do this?
  • edited January 2014
    Hi,
    All good photo editing programs are similar when it comes to sizing. Usually on the 'image' tab you will find an option to resize. You can usually resize by 3 options (pixels, percentage and dimensions).
    For cropping, you should be looking at the tool menu (usually at the side of the screen) for a shape like a squashed square with a line diagonally thru it. Place your cursor on your picture where you wish to start cropping and then 'click and drag' to the place you want to stop. When you release the mouse button, you will see a rectangle on your picture which may be highlighted from the rest. This rectangle will have nodes or 'handles' at each corner and in the middle of the sides. By moving these you can resize your rectangle if you wish. By placing the cursor over the center of the rectangle, it will usually become a 'hand' icon. By clicking and dragging this hand you can move the whole rectangle around your picture. When you are satisfied with your crop, click on 'ok' and your picture will be cropped and enlarged. You can then save it under a different file name.
    Word of caution; always use a copy of your original picture when cropping unless you are sure that the crop is the picture you want. Some programs actually prompt you before cropping whether you want to use the original or a copy. I always choose copy. Rename the crop differently to save overwriting an original (eg. Picture A_crop01.jpg)
    I hope this makes sense. It is quite an easy procedure and an extremely useful one.
    When @Cliff spoke of zooming in, imagine you have a picture of a garden gnome in a flower border taken with a wide angle lens. When you crop just the gnome, it will appear as if you had zoomed in with a telephoto lens.
    Best regards, PBked
  • edited March 2014
    When cropping a photo how important is it to maintain a standard sized photo?

    Up to this point I've been cropping to what I feel looks good. I haven't taken into consideration the space needed around the edges in order to frame well. I have copies of my originals but in many cases I have framed the photo too tight as I actually captured the image. :(

    My main concern at this time are all the irregular sizes I've created by cropping my photos. Is this simply remedied with a custom mat or should I strive to crop to standard sizes?
    If so, I don't know how to do that; the dimensions all seem greek to me.
  • edited March 2014
    Hi there,
    It depends on how often you print and frame or how you store your pictures. In the old days when prints were stored in albums you were restricted to set sizes such as 4x6 or 5x7. However, digital albums do not have this constraint - photos can be any size or shape you want them to be. I would follow your instincts and crop to what looks good, whether you do this in camera by zooming or in post production with software. If you need to occasionally produce a fixed size like 5x7, then use layers to create the size and overlay your cropped picture, cloning in the new border from the original.
    Hope this helps.
    Regards,
    PBked
  • edited June 2014
    I don't think any of these answers really answer the question cliff asked. I have the same question he had. I believe he meant, how do I zoom in the picture on the camera then save the image you see on the camera, not on the computer? Does anybody know how to do that? Is it possible to do in the Canon 60D?
  • edited June 2014
    Hi Juana,
    Cliff specifically mentioned using Canon's programs, not camera, to zoom in. I believe my answers addressed the questions he was asking. However, to answer your question which is completely different, it is not possible to do zooming, cropping and saving on the 60D.
    Regards,
    PBked
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